With the passing of Labor Day, New York’s summer season comes to an unofficial end—although there are still a few more weeks left before fall technically begins. Enjoy the warm weather while you can!

The rest of September is jam-packed full of events, including the annual Feast of San Gennaro (12–22 September) in Little Italy. San Gennaro is the patron saint of Naples, where many of New York’s immigrant Italians hail from, and this vast festival in his honor takes place over 11 days, featuring street food, music, parades, church services and a cannoli-eating competition.

As we move into fall, the temperature will cool down a bit but remain pleasant enough for the various Oktoberfest celebrations that occur thoughtout New York. Tents will start popping up around the City starting late September. Pop in for a giant beer to ring in the autumn months. The largest Oktoberfest occurs in Central Park following the Steuben Parade, but New York is full of beer gardens and beer halls where you can kick back.

Architecture and history buffs look forward to fall as the season when many of New York’s institutions open their doors for behind-the-scenes tours. The openhousenewyork program has held its annual Open House Weekend in October (12–13 October), giving people occasion to visit portions of several New York City landmarks that are otherwise off-limits to the public. During Open House Weekend and throughout October, Brooklyn’s Green-Wood Cemetery often opens some of its mausoleums and gives special guided tours.

And there are hidden gems of a different sort to discover in October during the CMJ Music Marathon. This annual music festival showcases the future stars of the indie-music universe (CMJ, of course, stands for College Music Journal). CMJ is 15–19 October this year.

This handful of events is only the start of what’s happening this fall. For more, see our main website’s NYC Fall Preview and Fall Festival Guide.

[Photos: San Gennaro, Joe Buglewicz; beer, Clayton Cotterell; Green-Wood Cemetery, Phil Kline; CMJ, Joe Buglewicz/NYC & Company]

HISTORIC LITERARY SITES: Have you ever wondered where the greatest writers in America’s history wrote their greatest works? As we head into fall, when many of New York’s literary festivals take place, it’s time to take a self-guided literary tour.Start your tour at 6 Pearl Street in Manhattan, where Herman Melville began his life, in the bustling harbour of New York. Head uptown to 170 East 2nd Street to see the apartment where Allan Ginsberg penned Howl. Then it’s up and across to 454 West 20th Street, where Ginsberg contemporary Jack Kerouac hammered out On the Road (pictured). Just three blocks north of there, at 14 West 23rd Street, is where Edith Wharton started forming her fascinating insights into the New York social scene. Many more such sites can be found here.
Do note that unless stipulated, you cannot enter the apartments. Merely look up and hope that a little bit of genius rubs off.
[Photo: Joe Buglewicz/NYC & Company]

HISTORIC LITERARY SITES: Have you ever wondered where the greatest writers in America’s history wrote their greatest works? As we head into fall, when many of New York’s literary festivals take place, it’s time to take a self-guided literary tour.

Start your tour at 6 Pearl Street in Manhattan, where Herman Melville began his life, in the bustling harbour of New York. Head uptown to 170 East 2nd Street to see the apartment where Allan Ginsberg penned Howl. Then it’s up and across to 454 West 20th Street, where Ginsberg contemporary Jack Kerouac hammered out On the Road (pictured). Just three blocks north of there, at 14 West 23rd Street, is where Edith Wharton started forming her fascinating insights into the New York social scene. Many more such sites can be found here.

Do note that unless stipulated, you cannot enter the apartments. Merely look up and hope that a little bit of genius rubs off.

[Photo: Joe Buglewicz/NYC & Company]

Summer, sadly, is almost over, and that means the autumn Broadway season will be here in no time. We take a look at the shows opening on the “Great White Way” this season.

Summer, sadly, is almost over, and that means the autumn Broadway season will be here in no time. We take a look at the shows opening on the “Great White Way” this season.

To go to Myers of Keswick for the first time as someone who has been away from Blighty for a long time is to feel pure, joyful excitement. Excitement that you never before realized you would feel for finding a shop that sells Crunchies, Hob’nobs, chocolate digestives, Twirls, Dib Dabs, barley water and everything Heinz. This traditional British grocery store in New York’s West Village also happen to be the one place that you can get real bacon and sausages. It is a guarantee that you will walk out with a giant bag and a bigger smile.

634 Hudson Street, Manhattan NY 10014. Nearest trains: A/C/E, L, 1/2/3

On Mondays in August the West Harlem Food & Beverage Association and Let’s Cruise host the West Harlem Gastro Cruise. The cruise is a fantastic way to have a taste of West Harlem’s up-and-coming restaurant scene. Guests board a boat at the World Financial Center Terminal in Lower Manhattan and motor up the Hudson, all the while being treated to spectacular views of NYC. After disembarking, the cruise includes dinner at your choice of one of ten different restaurants. To book tickets for tonight’s cruise, visit http://www.letscruise.com/Harlem.html

[Photos: Tagger Yancey/NYC & Company]

Ask the average New Yorker their opinion on mushy peas and they are likely to contort their face in disgust. But A Salt and Battery knows better. This Yorkshire-owned chip shop is among the handful of places in New York that do fish and chips right, from the crisp battered cod all the way down to the fat, soft chips doused in malt vinegar—all with a generous side of mushy peas. And you can get a can of Vimto to boot!
112 Greenwich Avenue, Manhattan NY 10011. Nearest train lines: A/C/E, L, 1/2/3

Ask the average New Yorker their opinion on mushy peas and they are likely to contort their face in disgust. But A Salt and Battery knows better. This Yorkshire-owned chip shop is among the handful of places in New York that do fish and chips right, from the crisp battered cod all the way down to the fat, soft chips doused in malt vinegar—all with a generous side of mushy peas. And you can get a can of Vimto to boot!

112 Greenwich Avenue, Manhattan NY 10011. Nearest train lines: A/C/E, L, 1/2/3

cjwho:

The High Line, Manhattan, New York

The High Line is a public park built on an historic freight rail line elevated above the streets on Manhattan’s West Side. It is owned by the City of New York, and maintained and operated by Friends of the High Line. Founded in 1999 by community residents, Friends of the High Line fought for the High Line’s preservation and transformation at a time when the historic structure was under the threat of demolition. It is now the non-profit conservancy working with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation to make sure the High Line is maintained as an extraordinary public space for all visitors to enjoy. In addition to overseeing maintenance, operations, and public programming for the park, Friends of the High Line works to raise the essential private funds to support more than 90 percent of the park’s annual operating budget, and to advocate for the preservation and transformation of the High Line at the Rail Yards, the third and final section of the historic structure, which runs between West 30th and West 34th Streets.
The High Line is located on Manhattan’s West Side. It runs from Gansevoort Street in the Meatpacking District to West 34th Street, between 10th & 11th Avenues. The first section of the High Line opened on June 9, 2009. It runs from Gansevoort Street to West 20th Street. The second section, which runs between West 20th and West 30th Streets, opened June 8, 2011.

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humansofnewyork:

Today in microfashion…

humansofnewyork:

Today in microfashion…

New York City’s Broadway Week is fast approaching, which means you can see 19 different Broadway productions that are offering special 2-for-1 tickets to select showings. Broadway Week runs from 2 September through the 15th, but tickets are on sale now. Buy them now before you visit!

New York City’s Broadway Week is fast approaching, which means you can see 19 different Broadway productions that are offering special 2-for-1 tickets to select showings. Broadway Week runs from 2 September through the 15th, but tickets are on sale now. Buy them now before you visit!